Pool committee gets creative with fundraising

Bob and Greta Mierau are participating in the Save Our Swimming Pool fund drive by donating grain. They are part of a multi-generational family that has enjoyed the pool for decades. Greta said they decided to donate because she went to the swimming pool as a child and now she takes her children there. “It’s a draw for the whole community,” she said. Pictured are several members of the family, including LeRoy Kohlmeyer, Karsen Mierau, Phyllis Kohlmeyer, Greta, Sawyer, Bob and Heather Mierau, Autumn Page and Brennan Mierau. ~ Emily Bialkowski

Bob and Greta Mierau are participating in the Save Our Swimming Pool fund drive by donating grain. They are part of a multi-generational family that has enjoyed the pool for decades. Greta said they decided to donate because she went to the swimming pool as a child and now she takes her children there. “It’s a draw for the whole community,” she said.
Pictured are several members of the family, including LeRoy Kohlmeyer, Karsen Mierau, Phyllis Kohlmeyer, Greta, Sawyer, Bob and Heather Mierau, Autumn Page and Brennan Mierau.
~ Emily Bialkowski

“How many bushels of corn and beans does it take to fill the current pool?” asked SOS campaign volunteer, Harley Meiners, based on discussion at a recent community meeting.

The question was the impetus for the Grain Drive to Fill Up The Pool to support the $1.7 million capital campaign to build a new aquatic center to serve the Caledonia, Brownsville, Eitzen, Freeburg and Houston areas.

Accounts for the SOS Campaign have been established for the project with the Farmer’s Coop Elevator, which will include its four sites in Caledonia, Houston, Rushford and Spring Grove. Farmers may bring their grain to contribute to any of these sites to secure the value for the campaign.

If farmers have questions, they may contact Lexi at the Farmer’s Coop Elevator at 1-800-450-7733.

The current tank, which will be renovated to save on costs, holds 83,300 gallons of water, which could figuratively hold 10,415 bushels. The goal will be to secure enough grain donations at the elevator to fill the current tank size. This a good way for farmers to give toward the project with the event perfectly timed for the ongoing harvest.

Farmers have their own control number, which provides the accounting necessary to keep track of every donation of wagonloads of corn or soybeans. All the farmer will need to do is specify how many wagons of grain they want to give to the campaign. Each wagonload is approximately 300 bushels.

Most forms of appreciated property such as land, buildings, houses or crops make good giving vehicles.  Farmers can capitalize on high crop prices while taking advantage of tax-wise giving opportunities.  For example, when farmers sell their crops to the elevator, they not only have to pay income tax on the profit, but they also have to pay self-employment tax.  That’s about another15 percent. If, on the other hand, they deliver a load of corn or beans in the name of SOS Aquatic Center Campaign, they don’t have any income on that portion of the crop; thus no income or self-employment tax.

Campaign volunteers will be contacting local farmers for the opportunity to fill up the pool!  Anyone wishing to pledge or review campaign materials can pick up information from Jessica Kohnen at Caledonia City Hall or go to  www.SOSPoolcampaign.com.

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