Donated blood and a life saved

Ron Rohrer is back to lifting hay bales for his horses, including George, pictured here, after an abdominal aortic aneurysm almost took his life on Oct. 28, 2012. ~ Submitted

Ron Rohrer is back to lifting hay bales for his horses, including George, pictured here, after an abdominal aortic aneurysm almost took his life on Oct. 28, 2012.
~ Submitted

By Diana Hammell

The Caledonia Argus

 

Ron Rohrer of Brownsville is alive today thanks to generous people who gave blood at a Red Cross blood drive.

“He is a miracle,” his wife Sharon Field-Rohrer said. “The only reason he is alive is because so many people prayed for him, he had skilled physicians, and lots of blood products were made available to him. He received 31 units of blood product the first night after his abdominal aortic aneurysm. That many donors were responsible for him making it through just the first night’s crisis.”

Rohrer received more blood throughout the next 22 days of his intensive care stay.

 

Keeping the fires going

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is when the large blood vessel (aorta) that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis and legs becomes abnormally large or balloons outward. The larger the aneurysm, the more likely it is to rupture and break open and cause internal bleeding.

“I had no hope whatsoever,” Field-Rohrer said. “I couldn’t see how he could possibly make it. Now he’s back to taking care of his horses, keeping the wood fire going, playing cards and his normal life. It was all worth it. Only one percent survive a burst abdominal aortic aneurysm.”

 

Community and family rally

“We heard from so many people; we had lots of prayers,” Field-Rohrer said.

The two Brownsville churches prayed for him, and he was on the prayer chain in Caledonia. Father Leif came to the hospital and Father McCauley, Sister Michaeline and Sister Agnes Clare all were frequent visitors. Their 11 children were great support and they heard from all 29 of their grandchildren.

“They took good care of me, too,” Field-Rohrer said.

 

The crucial thing

“The crucial thing was the availability of blood product,” Field-Rohrer said. “I used to give blood, but after my heart attack, they wouldn’t take it anymore.

“Our family will all start to give back now,” Field-Rohrer said. “It’s a very rewarding thing to do. We know how valuable the gift is now. It’s the gift of life.”

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