The Caledonia Argus http://hometownargus.com The Caledonia Argus covers community news, sports, current events and provides advertising and information for the cities of Caledonia, Eitzen, and Brownsville; Independent School District 299 and Houston County, Minnesota. Tue, 03 Mar 2015 18:50:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Original ordinance back in place http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/original-ordinance-back-in-place/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/original-ordinance-back-in-place/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 18:50:14 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37431 Three years of meetings and revisions, and county is right back to where it was with its frac sand regulations following inability to approve a new ordinance as moratorium looms

 

By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

The Houston County board of commissioners are going to have to agree to disagree.

Following a unanimous vote to send a proposed ordinance that would have included language that prohibits industrial scale frac sand mining to County Attorney Sam Jandt, the Houston County Board of Commissioners on Tuesday, March 3 were unable to find an ordinance that the 4/5 majority could agree upon.

With a moratorium on the practice set to expire on March 5, the county’s original ordinance, which all sides agreed needed some revision, will now remain in place.

Commissioner Justin Zmyewski, who served on the study committee tasked with coming up with an ordinance, made several attempts at passing a document that included a sentence prohibiting extraction of silica sand as defined by state statute.

Zmyewski wondered why now “in the 59th second of the 59th hour would we back pedal from the document we sent to our attorney to come up with findings of facts?”

Planning Commission Chairman Dan Griffin, said he felt the ordinance that the study committee presented for approval would limit the number of mines who would try to operate in Houston County.

“It is a place to start,” Griffin said of the document. “Maybe as we go through the reclamation process, maybe we do have to step back in, but this is a place to start.”

Griffin noted that currently there are 131 mines in the county, some 73 of which are currently in-active.

“We need to see which of those mines even want to operate and do business,” Griffin noted. “I’m just throwing out numbers here but maybe 30 of them don’t even want to operate anymore, then we’re down to 43.”

Griffin said that a 60,000 cubic yard limit would make it cost prohibitive for the large scale mining companies to want to operate in Houston County.

Of the 131 currently permitted mines, many are “grandfathered” in under the old ordinance. Some obtained their permits as long ago as 1972.

“You have to consider the original intent of the permit,” Griffin said. “In some cases they might have just put their location and the amount of land they planned to mine. There may be no mention of original intended use.”

Griffin added that some permits contain language in their permit that restricts them to mining say rock and not sand.

“I would think that if the original intent of the mine was rock then they would not be able to mine sand,” he said.

Several members of a standing-room only crowd were excused from the meeting by commissioner Steve Schuldt.

Any outburst led to a sheriff’s deputy escort from the proceedings.

As the tensions continued to rise regarding the adoption of an ordinance, commissioner Zmyewski tried to lobby his fellow commissioners to make a stand.

As Teresa Walters stated that she has heard from both sides of the issue, Zmyewski asked that she document such claims.

“The Houston County News and Rochester Post Bulletin have done a total of three polls between them where over 90 percent of our county is in favor of a ban,” Zmyewski said. “Look around, this room is packed and 90 percent of our constituents don’t want us to approve this.”

Zmyewski wanted the commissioners to take a stand now, while they still could.

“Why be reactive, why not be proactive,” he asked.

After Zmyewski’s ordinance failed to pass with he and commissioner Dana Kjome voting in favor, commissioner Storlie made a motion to approve the draft ordinance that was presented by the planning commission.

That motion failed to obtain the 4/5 majority needed for approval.

As discussion continued Zmyewski challenged the rest of the board as to why they would make the decision they had.

“I don’t want anything rammed down my throat,” commissioner Steve Schuldt would reply.

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Alexandria – A Destination for Play http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/alexandria-a-destination-for-play/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/alexandria-a-destination-for-play/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 17:00:04 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37428 Alexandria_900x200_3

Recognized as one of the 10 best small towns in America, Alexandria is a great destination for play, play and more play. A charming small town blend of trendy, eclectic shops and restaurants surrounded by beautiful lakes and natural beauty, it’s no wonder that the Alexandria area has become such a popular place to visit… and even stay.

Alexandria_900x200_2

For fishing and boating enthusiasts, you’re at lake country’s front door with 300 lakes nearby. Or while the family’s on the water, stroll Alexandria’s boutiques and museums or even visit a winery. Visit DestinationUpNorth.com to see some of the best in the area.

Of course an area that boasts a native such as Tom Lehman knows how to do golf right but there is so much more to do in the area as well. Bike the Central Lakes and the Lake Wobegon Trails. If you’re looking for a little more speed, the area has multiple motor sports/marine dealers to get you the right equipment at the right price.

Alexandria_900x200_1
Visit Inspiration Peak which Sinclair Lewis once called one of the best sights in the state. Or take in summer stock theatre at Theatre L’Homme Dieu.

Just two hours up 94, the Alexandria area, your year-round getaway, is beckoning.

For more Northern Minnesota Destinations, visit DestinationUpNorth.com.

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Rate Hikes? Not in 2015 http://www.adviceiq.com/content/rate-hikes-not-2015 http://www.adviceiq.com/content/rate-hikes-not-2015#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 16:00:18 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?guid=4faa8ce59b946c75bab158d4e91d0a9a When the economy recovers, interest rates will go up, right? Probably not: Inflation and economic growth are too low to convince the Federal Reserve to boost them this year.

That’s been the Federal Reserve Board’s line for years now. Yet as the Fed gushes about an allegedly booming economy, some are saying that interest rates are unlikely to increase this year.

So what gives?

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:Interest-Rate-Chart-300x180.png

The recent Federal Open Market Committee Statement, which summarizes monetary policy, noted that since the FOMC’s December meeting, “the economy has been expanding at a solid pace.” The statement notes that the unemployment rate is declining, consumer spending is increasing and, if not for that troublesome housing market, everything would be just dandy.

As if to put an exclamation point on the FOMC statement, Fed Chair Janet Yellen met with congressional Democrats last week to reiterate just how fine the economy is doing. The real purpose of the meeting may have been to explain the FOMC statement to members of Congress, as it contains phrases such as, “underutilization of labor resources continues to diminish.” This passage be worded more clearly, saying, “Many former middle managers are still working as greeters at WalMart.”

Yet, in spite of the glorious recovery, not everyone expects interest rates to rise soon. ZIRP, or “zero interest rate policy,” has been with us for years and some believe it will continue through 2015.

Economists at Morgan Stanley, for example, are acting like the Chicago Cubs and saying, “Wait until next year.” That’s a shift from previous expectations of rates rising this summer, which is a song virtually all pundits previously sang in unison.

Readers of our newsletter, Wenning Advice, may have noticed the following paragraph: “Some experts predict rates will increase in March. Others are sticking with the frequently voiced belief that they will increase this summer. However, logic indicates that they are unlikely to increase until 2016.”

To our knowledge, the economists at Morgan Stanley are not readers of Wenning Advice, but they pushed back their forecast for the first rate hike to March 2016 “because of the factors holding inflation down.” Namely, low oil prices and a higher dollar.

The Fed wants to see a 2% annual inflation rate, although the Consumer Price Index has not obliged, lately standing at just 0.2% not including food and energy.

Many still think that rates will rise this summer, but the Fed’s thwarted desire to boost inflation is just one reason they may not. There are others:

Patience. In the FOMC statement, Yellen said, “the Committee judges that it can be patient in beginning to normalize the stance of monetary policy.” The last time Ms. Yellen used the word “patient,” it was like the second coming of quantitative easing, or QE – the Fed’s now-defunct bond-buying stimulus program – the markets jumped.

Of course, saying “can be patient” is not the same as saying “will be patient.” But considering the Fed took three months to come up with the word, it’s good to see Yellen getting her money’s worth out of it. (Sorry for the cliché, but it’s most appropriate when discussing the Fed.)

The world’s a mess. As we’ve pointed out many times, economies in the rest of the world are making the U.S. look good. Their governments and central banks use QE, currency games and other tactics to manipulate markets and boost economies. If U.S. interest rates get too far out of sync with those of the rest of the world, it could harm both the economy and the stock market.

When rates increase, they usually do so gradually, to minimize the impact. If U.S. rates increase while rates are falling in the rest of the world, the effect would be more dramatic. The spread between U.S. rates and others would be more pronounced.

The U.S. economy is still a mess. When the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis estimated that U.S. gross domestic product expanded by 5% in the third quarter, many cheered that, at last, the economy had fully recovered from the Great Recession. But growth for the fourth quarter fell back to an estimated 2.6%.

“The GDP number is a little weaker, so it may give the Fed some pause as far as raising rates,” said Jeff Kravetz, regional investment strategist at US Bank Wealth Management.

The stock market opened the year with volatility on mixed news about the U.S. economy and corporate profits, though did rebound solidly through February and brushed record highs into March. 

The Keynesians are still in charge. The budget cuts from sequestration helped push the annual federal budget deficit down from more than $1 trillion to a little less than half that amount. In late January, though, President Barack Obama asked Congress to boost spending by 7% above what the “mindless budget cuts” allow. (Note: Obama originally supported the sequestration.)

More government spending and easy money policies together are the Keynesians’ answer to any economic problem. Higher interest rates, certainly, also increase the cost of servicing the federal debt. So if both interest rates and spending increase, things could quickly get out of control. Oh wait, they’re already out of control. The cost of servicing the federal debt for 2014 was $430.8 billion.

So will interest rates increase this year? Don’t bet on it.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Brenda P. Wenning is president of Wenning Investments LLC in Newton, Mass. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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When the economy recovers, interest rates will go up, right? Probably not: Inflation and economic growth are too low to convince the Federal Reserve to boost them this year.

That’s been the Federal Reserve Board’s line for years now. Yet as the Fed gushes about an allegedly booming economy, some are saying that interest rates are unlikely to increase this year.

So what gives?

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:Interest-Rate-Chart-300x180.png

The recent Federal Open Market Committee Statement, which summarizes monetary policy, noted that since the FOMC’s December meeting, “the economy has been expanding at a solid pace.” The statement notes that the unemployment rate is declining, consumer spending is increasing and, if not for that troublesome housing market, everything would be just dandy.

As if to put an exclamation point on the FOMC statement, Fed Chair Janet Yellen met with congressional Democrats last week to reiterate just how fine the economy is doing. The real purpose of the meeting may have been to explain the FOMC statement to members of Congress, as it contains phrases such as, “underutilization of labor resources continues to diminish.” This passage be worded more clearly, saying, “Many former middle managers are still working as greeters at WalMart.”

Yet, in spite of the glorious recovery, not everyone expects interest rates to rise soon. ZIRP, or “zero interest rate policy,” has been with us for years and some believe it will continue through 2015.

Economists at Morgan Stanley, for example, are acting like the Chicago Cubs and saying, “Wait until next year.” That’s a shift from previous expectations of rates rising this summer, which is a song virtually all pundits previously sang in unison.

Readers of our newsletter, Wenning Advice, may have noticed the following paragraph: “Some experts predict rates will increase in March. Others are sticking with the frequently voiced belief that they will increase this summer. However, logic indicates that they are unlikely to increase until 2016.”

To our knowledge, the economists at Morgan Stanley are not readers of Wenning Advice, but they pushed back their forecast for the first rate hike to March 2016 “because of the factors holding inflation down.” Namely, low oil prices and a higher dollar.

The Fed wants to see a 2% annual inflation rate, although the Consumer Price Index has not obliged, lately standing at just 0.2% not including food and energy.

Many still think that rates will rise this summer, but the Fed’s thwarted desire to boost inflation is just one reason they may not. There are others:

Patience. In the FOMC statement, Yellen said, “the Committee judges that it can be patient in beginning to normalize the stance of monetary policy.” The last time Ms. Yellen used the word “patient,” it was like the second coming of quantitative easing, or QE – the Fed’s now-defunct bond-buying stimulus program – the markets jumped.

Of course, saying “can be patient” is not the same as saying “will be patient.” But considering the Fed took three months to come up with the word, it’s good to see Yellen getting her money’s worth out of it. (Sorry for the cliché, but it’s most appropriate when discussing the Fed.)

The world’s a mess. As we’ve pointed out many times, economies in the rest of the world are making the U.S. look good. Their governments and central banks use QE, currency games and other tactics to manipulate markets and boost economies. If U.S. interest rates get too far out of sync with those of the rest of the world, it could harm both the economy and the stock market.

When rates increase, they usually do so gradually, to minimize the impact. If U.S. rates increase while rates are falling in the rest of the world, the effect would be more dramatic. The spread between U.S. rates and others would be more pronounced.

The U.S. economy is still a mess. When the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis estimated that U.S. gross domestic product expanded by 5% in the third quarter, many cheered that, at last, the economy had fully recovered from the Great Recession. But growth for the fourth quarter fell back to an estimated 2.6%.

“The GDP number is a little weaker, so it may give the Fed some pause as far as raising rates,” said Jeff Kravetz, regional investment strategist at US Bank Wealth Management.

The stock market opened the year with volatility on mixed news about the U.S. economy and corporate profits, though did rebound solidly through February and brushed record highs into March. 

The Keynesians are still in charge. The budget cuts from sequestration helped push the annual federal budget deficit down from more than $1 trillion to a little less than half that amount. In late January, though, President Barack Obama asked Congress to boost spending by 7% above what the “mindless budget cuts” allow. (Note: Obama originally supported the sequestration.)

More government spending and easy money policies together are the Keynesians’ answer to any economic problem. Higher interest rates, certainly, also increase the cost of servicing the federal debt. So if both interest rates and spending increase, things could quickly get out of control. Oh wait, they’re already out of control. The cost of servicing the federal debt for 2014 was $430.8 billion.

So will interest rates increase this year? Don’t bet on it.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Brenda P. Wenning is president of Wenning Investments LLC in Newton, Mass. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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New location for International Owl Center, will also host events this weekend http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/new-location-for-international-owl-center-will-also-host-events-this-weekend/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/new-location-for-international-owl-center-will-also-host-events-this-weekend/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:39:49 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37423 Dan McGonigle/The Caledonia Argus  The new Owl Center in Houston.

Dan McGonigle/The Caledonia Argus
The new Owl Center in Houston.

By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

You’re invited to the 13th Annual International Festival of Owls, Friday, March 6 through Sunday, March 8.

Much of the excitement can be found at the Houston High School though the International Festival of Owls center as well as the Four Seasons Community Center will also host events.

Be sure to check the schedule of events in the Caledonia Argus or the Argus Shopper to be certain of the time and location.

“You can also find a schedule of events on our website,” said director Karla Bloem.

The web address is www.festivalofowls.com.

The final touches are being put on their location in Houston which will be hosting their first International Festival of Owls celebration.

The center will feature live owls on static display, some programming and other interactive experiences.

A mounting demo on Sunday is also scheduled.

Festival admission will cover entrance into the center as well as the events scheduled to take place at the high school in Houston.

New center

On August 1 the Interntational Owl Center took on the lease at their current location.

Plans continue towards building a more permanent structure which will house the center.

Furnishings were donated by area businesses like Gundersen Health Center.

Acentek helped get the center wired for internet and phone.

“The space is working out great for us,” Bloem stated.

She and her staff are looking forward to greeting the numerous guests both local and out of town who are expected to ascend upon Houston for the events scheduled this weekend.

“We know the center will be ready,” Bloem said.

Daniel McGonigle/The Caledonia Argus  Left, Susan Fletcher, Educator with the International Owl Center, holds brother “Rupert” while Karla Bloem, director, holds “Ruby.”

Daniel McGonigle/The Caledonia Argus
Left, Susan Fletcher, Educator with the International Owl Center, holds brother “Rupert” while Karla Bloem, director, holds “Ruby.”

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Plenty for the scientist in all of us to experience http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/plenty-for-the-scientist-in-all-of-us-to-experience/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/plenty-for-the-scientist-in-all-of-us-to-experience/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:37:48 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37421 By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

While the International Owl Festival is a great place for kids and families to learn, play and interact with owl enthusiasts, there is also plenty for the adults.

“We offer something for everyone and every level of interest,” International Owl Festival Director Karla Bloem said. “From kids to adults, from the marginally interested to the dedicated scientist, something is planned for all levels of interest.”

For the purpose of this article we shall focus on the “dedicated scientists.”

Several such individuals will conduct or present as part of the International Owl Festival March 6, 7 and 8.

Here are some of

the highlights:

• Parade of Owls Art Tour Capstone Event. Saturday, March 7 at 11 a.m. Houston Arts Resource Council. Andy Maus, executive director of the Minnesota Marine Art Museum.

• Blakiston’s Fish Owls and Spotted Owls: ancient forest conservation. Sunday, March 8 at 10:30 a.m.

Dr. Rocky Gutierrez, Spotted Owl Researcher and Gordon Gullion Endowed Chair in Forest Wildlife Research, University of Minnesota.

Dr. Gutierrez will talk about Don the Blakiston’s Fish Owl, winner of the World Owl Hall of Fame’s Lady Gray’l Award. You’ll learn how the Blakiston’s Fish Owls and our Spotted Owl are both symbols for old forest conservation and how the protection laws differ in Japan, Russia and the United States. Find out about the current state of decline of the northern and California Spotted Owls and the as yet unannounced petition to list the last subspecies as endangered.

• Wild at Heart: Owl Rehabilitation and Conservation in Arizona. Sunday, March 8 at 12:30 p.m. Bob Fox, Wild at Heart.

Arizona

Wild at Heart has done extensive work with Burrowing Owl relocation, breeding of the endangered Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl, and is a leader in rehabilitation. Join World Owl Hall of Fame Special Achievement Award winner Bob Fox to learn more about the great work done at Wild at Heart.

No pre-registration is necessary. An admission sticker is required, which can be purchased at the door.

Programs at Houston High School.

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Annual banquet to be at Four Seasons Community Center http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/annual-banquet-to-be-at-four-seasons-community-center/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/annual-banquet-to-be-at-four-seasons-community-center/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:37:14 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37419 By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

For the first time, the Festival of Owls will host their annual banquet at the Four Seasons Community Center in Caledonia.

“We are excited to be holding the banquet in that location,” Karla Bloem, director at the International Owl Center in Houston said. “It is nice to include all parts of Houston County.”

This year at the annual banquet, Marco Mastrorilli of Italy will be presented with the special achievement award.

Also to be reconginzed will be Dr. Karel Voous of the Netherlands who has earned the champion of owls award. The award will be given posthumously with one of his former students attending the festival to accept for his former mentor and teacher.

Dr. Karel Voous 

The Netherlands

Champion of Owls award

Dr. Wouter van der Weijden, a former student of the late Dr. Voous, will describe some of Voous’ lifelong work with owls and their conservation, including his magnus opus: “Owls of the Northern Hemisphere.” Dr. van der Weijden will also discuss some of his own owl vocal research conducted while he was a student of Dr. Voous.

Marco Mastrorilli – Italy

Special achievement award

Marco’s work with owls spans 26 years and many species. Besides authoring nearly 50 scientific publications, he has also penned 11 books about owls, many for the general public. He understands the importance of bringing scientific information about owls to the general public, which led him to create the Festival dei Gufi (Festival of Owls/Italy). The 2014 festival attracted 25,000 visitors.

Banquet information

“Our Saturday night program includes a banquet, presentation of the World Owl Hall of Fame Awards, and presentations by two of the Hall of Fame winners,” Bloem said.

There will be a 5 p.m. social hour and cash bar, 6 p.m. meal and program to follow the meal.

It will be held on Saturday, March 7, at the Four Seasons Community Center, 900 N. Kingston St., Caledonia.

The cost is $40/person to attend the banquet and presentation ($35 for International Owl Center members). Cost is $50/person if registering March 2 or later for members or non-members. Limit 250. Pre-registration requested for meal planning so register today!

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Council chooses big transformers for stability and growth http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/council-chooses-big-transformers-for-stability-and-growth/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/council-chooses-big-transformers-for-stability-and-growth/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:36:30 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37417 By Kelley Stanage

The Caledonia Argus

The Caledonia City Council considered proposals from STAR Energy Services which included various options for configurations of transformers for their electric utility substation upgrade. Facing a total demand of 7,400 kVA, the council considered whether they should go with A: one 6,500 kVA and one 13,000 kVA transformer, or B: with two 13,000 kVA transformers. Head electrician, Matt Blocker, explained that option A would be less expensive, however, if the larger of the two were to go down, the smaller one would not support the demand, causing rolling blackouts to occur throughout the city. Choosing option B would support the entire city should an outage occur on one unit, and would also provide additional capacity should a large company opt to move to the area.

After confirming the city had adequate money available in their electrical fund, they voted unanimously to purchase the two larger transformers. Councilmember Paul Fisch said, “Once this is done, we have pretty much overhauled the whole city,” and mayor Joshua Gran noted, “ There should not be another big electrical project for 15 years from 2016.” The transformer replacement project should be completed by the fall of 2016.

Houston County Environmental Services director Rick Frank addressed the council regarding the county’s recycling program. In his introductory remarks he said, “Year to year I, and I do apologize for last year I didn’t make it, but I usually go around and give the councils an update on the drop site system and kind of give an overall picture of what’s going through the systems. I know that it’s a partnership with the city, the townships and the county.” He was there to inform the council on the money collected by the county and, “what it spends out for.” Frank described the programs, costs, the various materials collected, as well as some of the challenges his department faces in finding resources to collect various types of recyclable materials.

Frank announced there would be three hazardous waste collections this year. They will be held from 1 to 6 p.m. on May 21 at the Houston Recycling Center, on July 8 at the Spring Grove drop off site, and on August 26, at the La Crescent drop off site. There will also be one annual fluorescent bulb collection, scheduled for April 11 at all drop off sites from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Norman Snodgrass attended the meeting to inform the council he would be doing some construction on a building on Kingston St. to accommodate an advertising business which will be moving in. It will require the installation of an overhead door to allow vehicles to move in and out of the building. The business does striping and advertising wraps on vehicles, among other things. A former office area will be used as a retail space.

In other business, the council:

• Approved expenditures for inspection of water towers.

• Approved the purchase of a new digger truck, to be delivered by the end of the year.

• Approved hiring Jessica Kohnen as utility billing clerk, contingent upon acceptance of wages.

• Moved a full-time police officer to permanent part-time, and advanced a temporary part-time police officer to full-time status.

• Approved acceptance of a grant to pay EMTs for training.

• Approved fee increases recommended by Parks and Recreation for pee-wee and t-ball.

• Accepted the resignation of assistant librarian, Eileen Jacobson, with thanks for her 17 years of dedication and commitment.

• Approved a gambling permit for the Knights of Columbus on March 21 at St. Mary’s Catholic Grade School.

• Set public hearings for March 23 at 6:10 p.m. to amend ordinance on limited industry district, and for March 23 at 6:15 p.m. to amend ordinance on residential collection services.

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Jammin’ in Jammies on Monday, March 9 with the Cat’s Pajamas http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/jammin-in-jammies-on-monday-march-9-with-the-cats-pajamas/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/jammin-in-jammies-on-monday-march-9-with-the-cats-pajamas/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:35:38 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37415 Submitted   The Cat’s Pajamas will perform on Monday, March 9 at the Caledonia MS/HS Auditorium.

Submitted
The Cat’s Pajamas will perform on Monday, March 9 at the Caledonia MS/HS Auditorium.

By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

Any pair will do.

Footie jammies, cotton two piece, one with characters, one without, any pair of pajamas worn to the Cat’s Pajama’s concert in Caledonia will yield three dollars off at the door.

“It is a little promotion as part of the concert,” Caledonia choir director Ross Martin said.

On Monday, March 9 at 7:30, the Cat’s Pajamas, an a cappella group based in Branson, Missouri will perform a show at the high school auditorium.

Without your jammies on, tickets will be $15 for adults and $12 for students. Come dressed for the occasion, and it will only set you back $12 for adults and $9 for students.

After expenses are covered from the show, the remaining funds will go towards the band and choir concert trip coming up at the end of the month.

The students will be headed to Nashville.

“This is our second year,” Martin noted. “They were so thrilled by the reception they received last year in Caledonia they said they wanted to stop here again on their current high school tour.

The Cat’s Pajamas

The Cat’s Pajamas vocal band is comprised of Skinner, Liam Ryan, Joshua David Evans, Donovan Germain and Michael Samsky.

Since 2005, the group has toured nationally and abroad and has brought their unique, high energy brand of a cappella to hundreds of thousands.

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Findings of facts, pro-land use testimony give commissioners pause http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/findings-of-facts-pro-land-use-testimony-give-commissioners-pause/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/findings-of-facts-pro-land-use-testimony-give-commissioners-pause/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:34:46 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37413 By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

Will it come down to a question of end use?

At a public hearing on Wednesday February 18, after hearing testimony from over 75 individuals, the county board took a unanimous, nonbinding vote that would have made the county the first in Minnesota or even Wisconsin for that matter, to outright ban silica sand mining.

The board then sent the document to county attorney Sam Jandt and requested that he submit “findings of facts” back to the board.

A vote, which could have possibly been taken at their regular February 24 county board meeting, was expected to follow.

But on Tuesday, no decision was made.

Commissioners, during their regular public comment period, allowed more individuals to speak on the matter.

Eric Johnson, who ran for county commissioner in District 2, spoke on behalf of his neighbor.

“Why would you deny him the right to do with his land as he pleases,” he asked?

Stating health concerns, Johnson lobbied to the county board that landowners should be able to benefit from their land in whatever matter the marketplace will dictate.

“It shouldn’t matter what the sand is used for at the end,” he said.

Other counties, like Fillmore and Winona have limited the number of mines or taken other measures to control the mining, but none have enacted a ban.

Officials would argue that by including language which limits the amount any one mine can produce in one year at 60,000 cubic yards, that it would make the larger mining interests avoid Houston County as it would be cost prohibitive.

Years in the making

In the past several years, mining the sand known as silica sand, used to extract oil and natural gas in North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and even other countries has taken off in Wisconsin and is beginning to take hold slowly in southeast Minnesota.

Houston County has been considering the practice and how best to permit such land uses for the better part of the past five years, with a planning commission reviewing the matter for the past three.

Many of the people who spoke at last week’s public hearing stressed the natural beauty of the county and how mines, multiple numbers of trucks and potential air and water pollution could jeopardize that beauty.

Commissioners Judy Storlie, Steve Schuldt and Teresa Walters said they wanted to go back to find the intent of what the original study committee who did the original work on the ordinance had intended.

Those who oppose expanding mining in Houston County were outraged that the commissioners allowed anyone to speak in regard to the ordinance.

“This is disgusting what you are doing with this public comment period,” Ken Tschumper who also ran for a spot on the board told the commissioners.

Commissioner Justin Zmyewski, who has been the strongest voice for the ban, said the ordinance is not dead.

“The language from last week remains,” Zmyewski stated. “I have no reason to believe my fellow commissioners will go against the wishes of the people and change their vote from last week.”

The findings of facts, however, did give the commissioners pause.

“We need time to consider this,” Storlie said.

In front of an expected full house, the board of commissioners are expected to make the vote during next week’s regular county board meeting.

A moratorium on silica sand mining is set to expire on March 5.

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School board hears ALiCE update, adopts several agenda items http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/school-board-hears-alice-update-adopts-several-agenda-items/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/school-board-hears-alice-update-adopts-several-agenda-items/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:34:06 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37411 Submitted   Members of the Caledonia School Board are front row (l to r): Emily Ranzenberger, student representative, Michelle Werner, Amanda King and Jean Meyer. Back row (l to r): Jared Barnes, Spencer Yohe, Jimmy Westland and chairman Kelley McGraw.

Submitted
Members of the Caledonia School Board are front row (l to r): Emily Ranzenberger, student representative, Michelle Werner, Amanda King and Jean Meyer. Back row (l to r): Jared Barnes, Spencer Yohe, Jimmy Westland and chairman Kelley McGraw.

By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

At their regular February meeting, the Caledonia Board of Education reviewed and addressed several matters.

After hearing a presentation from Caledonia police chief Kurt Zehnder on ALiCE training, which has been covered by this newspaper previously, the board conducted its regular business.

Highlights

• The board issued a ‘thank you’ to Immanuel Lutheran Church for their generous donation to the Student Milk Assistance Program.

• Jackie Johnson was named as the assistant boys’ and girls’ golf coach beginning the 2014-2015 school year.

• Policy #206 was adopted to address public participation in school board meetings or complaints about persons at school board meetings and data privacy considerations.

• The flexible learning year continues to garner consideration and the boards attention.

• The 2015-16 school calendar was reviewed.

• Several policies received their first reading per state statute.

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New lead jailer to assume role on March 8 http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/new-lead-jailer-to-assume-role-on-march-8/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/new-lead-jailer-to-assume-role-on-march-8/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:33:04 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37409 By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

Jordan Rooker was named as a full-time, probationary status lead jail dispatcher effective March 8.

Rooker will take over for Matt Mackie who is stepping back from lead jailer duties. Mackie will assume the position of regular status jailer-dispatcher.

Rooker was selected from a pool of three highly qualified internal candidates.

“Myself, the jail administrator and the chief deputy sheriff conducted interviews with the candidates,” Human Resources director Tess Kruger said. “All three were very qualified.”

“Jordan shined during the interview process,” chief deputy Travis Lapham said. “We look forward to having him in the role. I appreciate that he was willing to take the next step in his career.”

Jail administrator Mike Schmitz noted that Rooker came with a bachelors degree. The process uses scoring to rate the candidates. Having the four year degree, among other noted qualities, helped push Rooker to the position.

Other news

• A letter of understanding request was made by finance director Carol Lapham. Required by some paperwork requirements, the letter was approved by the board of commissioners.

• Department of Health grant funds submitted a letter of understanding which will need to be filed with the auditor’s office.

The funds, which track to make certain every expenditure done in the adult mental health unit of Human Services qualifies and are allowable, is part of the requirement for the grant.

The board of commissioners must make a motion to accept the funds.

Human Services director Linda Bahr said that the fiscal host will be changing in 2016 and that the board motion would be for funds for use in 2015.

The funds are in the amount of $77,500.

Bahr, however, hoped that DHS would reconsider the amount and it could push as high as $88,000, though that amount was not yet official.

“In years past it has been as high as $130,000,” Bahr said. “We had been hoping for $112,000.”

Bahr said she will push for additional money at the next director’s meeting.

The directors will be reviewing several of the amounts awarded prior to, and at that time.

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Two bridges among plans released by governor detailing a $6 billion highway funding deficit http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/two-bridges-among-plans-released-by-governor-detailing-a-6-billion-highway-funding-deficit/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/two-bridges-among-plans-released-by-governor-detailing-a-6-billion-highway-funding-deficit/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:32:16 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37407 In late January, Governor Mark Dayton proposed a solution to fix Minnesota’s aging transportation systems. Governor Dayton’s plan would invest $6 billion over the next ten years to address the state’s highway funding deficit, invest $2.356 billion in local government transportation projects, and provide $2.92 billion for metro and greater Minnesota transit systems. The Governor’s proposal would create an estimated 119,000 new jobs and build the infrastructure necessary to meet the demands of a growing population and an expanding state economy.

“Inadequate transportation clogs our lives with worse traffic congestion, longer commutes, more dangerous travel conditions. Those deficiencies restrict our future economic growth and detract from our quality of life,” Governor Dayton said. “If we continue to avoid these problems, they will only get worse. It’s time to begin to solve them. I urge the Legislature to work with me this session to begin to repair and improve Minnesota’s transportation systems.”

Houston County would see two bridge replacement projects as part of the governor’s proposal.

The bridge on  MN  Highway  16  over  Crystal  Creek  is one of the proposed projects outlined by the governor’s staff. The other would be on US  Highway  61, again a bridge,  over the Mississippi  River.

In 2012, Governor Dayton convened a bipartisan panel of experts – including policymakers, business and labor leaders, cabinet officials, and city and county officials from across the state – to study the funding needs of Minnesota’s highways, roads, bridges, and public transit systems. The Transportation Finance Advisory Committee’s (TFAC) analysis concluded that Minnesota faces a $6 billion state highway transportation funding deficit over the next 10 years to preserve our existing system, and make the improvements needed for our long-term prosperity. Facing a large and growing list of transportation needs, declining revenues, and an expected one million new residents over the next 25 years, the need for a major new investment in transportation is clear.

Governor Dayton’s Plan:

What It Buys

Governor Dayton’s transportation plan would allow for significant improvements to roads, bridges and transit systems statewide. Right now, more than half of Minnesota’s roads are more than 50 years old, and 40 percent of the state’s bridges are more than 40 years old. In just the next three years alone, one in five Minnesota roads will pass their useful life. And in the next ten years, nearly 40 percent of our roads will be past their useful life.

The Governor’s plan would repair or replace 2,200 miles of state roads. It would repair or replace 330 bridges statewide. Forty percent of the new revenues raised in the Governor’s proposal would be directed to cities, counties, and townships; giving local leaders the resources and flexibility to repair and replace local roads and bridges statewide.

“By 2040, Minnesota’s population is expected to grow by over 1 million people; 800,000 of them will live in the Twin Cities metro area,” Metropolitan Council Chair Adam Duininck said. “For the future livability of our region, and for the competitive benefit of our entire state’s economy, we need to invest today in expanding and improving our transit systems. The future of our state, and our ability to leverage the federal funding needed to build a modern transit system, depends on the wise and necessary investments we make today.”

The Governor’s transportation plan would bridge the $6 billion state highway transportation funding gap over the next ten years by raising new dedicated revenues for roads and bridges. It would also increase revenues for transit.

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Public Record http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/public-record-29/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/public-record-29/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:31:32 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37405 The following non-confidential traffic and criminal cases were  compiled from reports released from the court administrator’s office January 22 to February 5, 2015. Ages are given at time of offense.

DEPT. NATURAL RESOURCES

Travis John Peterson, 27, Rochester, Minn., hunting small game w/o a license, fined $175.

Derrick Conrad Nelson, 21, Brownsville, Minn., no game/fish license in possession, fine d$100.

MINNESOTA STATE PATROL

Deanna Lynn Calloway, 25, La Crescent, Minn., seat belt violation, fined $100.

Joseph Robert Clauson, 30, Spring Grove, Minn., driving after cancellation, fined $275.

Ronald Andrew Cole, 28, Kansas City, Mo., speeding, fined $125.

Melissa Marie Foth, 30, La Crosse, Wis., speeding, fined $115.

Gary Jon Lemke, 58, La Crescent, Minn., seat belt violation, fined $100.

Samantha Jo Meyer, 22, Caledonia, Minn., speeding, fined $115.

Angela Ranee Oelberg, 43, Caledonia, Minn., driving w/o a valid license, fined $175.

Scott Edward Rada, 44, La Crosse, Wis., speeding, fined $115.

Tarah Kay Sandven, 25, La Crescent, Minn., speeding, fined $115.

Melissa Nicole Twite, 28, Caledonia, Minn., speeding, fined $135.

Gwyn Cheryl Anderson, 48, La Crosse, Wis., speeding, fined $125.

Tasha Renee Hanson, 27, Caledonia, Minn., operate unregistered vehicle, fined $150.

Brittney Michelle Jenkins, 23, La Crosse, Wis., seat belt violation, fined $75.

Scott Edward Rada, 44, La Crosse,Wis., speeding, fined $115.

Mariah Brikell Scott, 18, Tomah, Wis., underage drinking and driving, fined $475, jail 90 days, stayed for 1 yr.

Steven Wayne Stensgard, 44, Holmen, Wis., speeding, fined $115.

Hans Eric Von Weiss, 50, Onalaska, Wis., speeding, fined $115.

HOUSTON COUNTY SHERIFF

Michael John Eastwood, 21, Decorah, Iowa, speeding, fined $375.

Christopher Quinn Griffin, 56, La Crosse, Wis., DWI, fined $1,100, $700 stayed for 2 yrs, jail 90 days stayed for 2 yrs, 2 yrs probation; speeding, fined $40.

Noah Shaun Marin-Forrester, 19, possess over 1.4 grams marijuana in motor vehicle, fined $75.

Edward Kevin Oldenburg, 48, Hokah, Minn., domestic assault, fined $1,575, $1,500 stayed, jail 365 days, 345 days stayed for 2 yrs, 2 yrs probation.

Dennis Scott Rask, 51, New Albin, Iowa, speeding, fined $215.

Jacob Samuel Williams, 22, Caledonia, Minn., receiving stolen property, prison 19 mos. stayed for 5 yrs, 5 yrs probation, jail 97 days.

Tammy Kay Wolff, 55, Houston, Minn., speeding, fined $135.

Christopher Ryan Forsberg, 24, Rochester, Minn., driving after revocation, fined $275.

Darcey Kathleen Holmberg, 36, Woodbury, Minn., speeding, fined $135.

Casey Muncell Jefferson, 42, Spring Grove, Minn., speeding, fined $215.

Amy Lynn Mathison, 43, New Albin, Iowa, seat belt violation, fined $100.

Dennis Scott Rask, 51, New Albin, Iowa, speeding, fined $215.

CALEDONIA POLICE DEPT.

Amanda Mary Beach, 32, La Crescent, Minn., DWI, fined $3,105, $2,500 stayed for 2 yrs, jail 365 days, 30 days stayed for 2 yrs, 2 yrs probation.

Kamera Joan Jonsgaard, 20, Houston, Minn., underage liquor consumption, fined $175; possession of drug paraphernalia, fined $50; possess/sale sm amt marijuana, fined $50; open bottle law violation, fined $100.

Daniel. Rudolph Oehmigen, 33, Spring Grove, Minn., issue dishonored check, fined $175, $50 stayed for 6 mo, $30.19 restitution, jail 10 days stayed for 6 mo, 6 mo probation.

Michael Patrick Senn, 36, Caledonia, Minn., DWI, fined $1,100, $700 stayed for 2 yrs, jail 90 days stayed for 2 yrs, 2 yrs probation.

Kristopher Richard Wolf, 31, Spring Grove, Minn., uninsured vehicle, fined $275.

LA CRESCENT POLICE DEPT.

Canadian Pacific Rail, Minneapolis, Minn., railroad equipment block crossing more than 10 minutes, fined $175.

Jennifer Dawn Edie, 35, La Crosse, Wis., driving after suspension, fined $375.

Christopher William Ballog Pierce, 19, La Crescent, Minn., underage liquor consumption, fined $175.

Christian Anthony Cieminski, 17, La Crosse, Wis., speeding, fined $125.

Bruce Edward LaSeure, 55, La Crescent, Minn., DWI, fined $1,105, $500 stayed for 2 yrs, jail 90 days, 87 days stayed for 2 yrs, 2 yrs probation.

Troy Kevin Norman, 34, La Crescent, Minn., driving after revocation, fined $175; no proof of insurance, fined $200.

SPRING GROVE POLICE DEPT.

Gary Allan Dahlberg, 68, Spring Grove, Minn., winter parking violation, fined $22.

Jennifer Dawn Edie, 30, La Crosse, Wis., theft, fined $145.

Jay Thomas Newell, 39, Spring Grove, Minn., winter parking violation, fined $22.

Gordon Arnold Schroeder, 64, Caledonia, Minn., winter parking violation, fined $22.

Taylor Elizabeth Elton, 20, Spring Grove, Minn., winter parking violation, fined $22.

Sydney Ann Gooder-Hayes, 25, Cresco, Iowa, speeding, fined $135.

Emily Lynn Johnson, 37, Hokah, Minn., winter parking violation, fined $22.

Tricia Lynn Laganiere-Sand, 43, Mabel, Minn., parking violation, fined $32.

Marh Elizabeth Osborne, 45, Spring Grove, Minn., winter parking violation, fined $22.

Aaron Lynd Unnasch, 26, Houston, Minn., operate unregistered vehicle, fined $175.

DIVORCES

Robyn Kay Rosenow and Terrance Michael Rosenow.

Tamara Sue Lovejoy-Wilson and Todd Dougherty Wilson.

Rebekah Renee Karpinsky Myer and Jason Lee Myer.

Mary Elizabeth Osborne and Thomas Eugene Osborne, Jr.

Mark Aaron Bennett and Amanda Jo Bennett.

Rosemarie Mills Von Arx and Gerald Allen Von Arx.

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Mayville Blue Ribbon Strivers one of two clubs in the state to receive 4-H Community Leadership Award http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/mayville-blue-ribbon-strivers-one-of-two-clubs-in-the-state-to-receive-4-h-community-leadership-award/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/mayville-blue-ribbon-strivers-one-of-two-clubs-in-the-state-to-receive-4-h-community-leadership-award/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:30:32 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37402 Submitted  Members of the Mayville Blue RIbbon Strivers work on planter boxes which produced nearly 300 pounds of food for the local food shelf. The group will be honored on March 4 for their efforts at the annual AMC meeting. They are one of just two clubs in the state to win the award.

Submitted
Members of the Mayville Blue RIbbon Strivers work on planter boxes which produced nearly 300 pounds of food for the local food shelf. The group will be honored on March 4 for their efforts at the annual AMC meeting. They are one of just two clubs in the state to win the award.

By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

The members of the Mayville Blue Ribbon Strivers will be one of just two clubs across the state who will receive an “AMC Award”.

“They are one of two clubs in the state to receive the award, which is for being leaders in their community,” U of MN, Houston County 4-H Program Coordinator, Rebecca Paulson said “They are accepting their award of a trophy and $250 on March 4.”

The club, which is made up of 53 members, was nominated and chosen from 4-H Clubs across the state following the project they completed at SEMCAC.

“We made flower boxes last summer,” club leader Mark Jennings noted. “We planted vegetables, took care of the watering and weeding and then gave the fresh produce to the food shelf.”

Jennings said that the club constructed four flower boxes about four feet by eight feet long and wide by two feet deep.

The club then donated them to SEMCAC, but it didn’t stop there.

The families of the members of the club planted seeds which were donated by SEMCAC. The watering and caring for the crops then continued during the growing season.

“Our families took care of the watering and caring for the crops,” Jennings said. “If a crop was ready for harvest, that family or club member who was caring for the boxes that week would harvest the crop and provide it to the food shelf for needy families.”

Each family took a week at a time from May to September.

Jennings was unsure of the exact amount of food the gardens produces, but thought it was about 260 pounds of fresh produce.

The program was so successful, that the Mayville Strivers have teamed up with the Caledonia Rockets to construct another six planter boxes which would bring the number to 10.

“We are in the process of beginning to build them right now,” Jennings said.

He said the two clubs will partner on the harvesting and care of the produce this year.

“It’s been a great project for us,” Jennings said.

AMC

At the annual Association of Minnesota Counties meeting, the president, vice president, secretary and treasurer of the Mayville Blue Ribbon Strivers will take the stage.

In front of a crowd of 200 to 300 county commissioners from across the state, the members will give a speech about the planter box project.

A county commissioner, in this case District 3 commissioner Steve Schuldt, had to write a letter of nomination for the club and their project.

“I am also on the SEMCAC board,” Schuldt noted. “When the club asked me to write a letter on their behalf for this project, I knew the impact it would have on the community. It was a wonderful idea. Having the kids taking care of the boxes, they were very dedicated. I think it was a good thing for everyone the way it worked out.”

Schuldt will be among those commissioners cheering on the Mayville club at the annual AMC meeting on Wednesday, March 4.

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Cavanaugh second at state at 106 http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/cavanaugh-second-at-state-at-106/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/cavanaugh-second-at-state-at-106/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:27:09 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37400 Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus  Kyle Cavanaugh, wrestling at 106, finished second overall at state in individual competition. Cavanaugh lost to a senior. He is pictured above against Patrick Lockwood of  Minneapolis Washburn.

Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus
Kyle Cavanaugh, wrestling at 106, finished second overall at state in individual competition. Cavanaugh lost to a senior. He is pictured above against Patrick Lockwood of Minneapolis Washburn.

By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

Kyle Cavanaugh, at 106 finished in second place at state wrestling this past weekend.

The 8th grade grappler opened his bracket with a pin over Patrick Lockwood of Minneapolis Washburn at the 3:03 mark.

Cavanaugh then won a triple overtime thriller, 7-6, over Waconia’s Garrett Vos.

Up next for Cavanaugh was Hser Eh Pwae of Worthington. Cavanaugh defeated him, again in triple overtime, 1-0.

Senior Josh Tarum of St. Thomas Academy, defeated Cavanaugh in the championship, 6-5.

Drew Stemper fell to Elijah Gronewold  of Fairmont/Martin County West at the 5:31 mark of his first match.

New Ulm’s Sam Hoppe defeated Mitchell Schmitz, 7-3 at 170.

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One step away: Showdown looms with Lourdes, return trip to state at stake http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/one-step-away-showdown-looms-with-lourdes-return-trip-to-state-at-stake/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/one-step-away-showdown-looms-with-lourdes-return-trip-to-state-at-stake/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:24:08 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37398 Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus  The 2015 1AA East sub-section champion Warrior basektball team. Front row left to right: Sean McGonigle, Tristan Ott, Owen King, Tanner Gran, Colton Lampert, Austin Bauer, Ethan DuCharme and  Thomas Jergenson. Back row (l to r): Jordan Burg, Carson Coffield, Henry Russert, Gavin Schroeder, Kyle Sorenson, Justin Burg, Seth Twite, Alex Goergen, Ben McCabe and Sam Barthel.

Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus
The 2015 1AA East sub-section champion Warrior basektball team. Front row left to right: Sean McGonigle, Tristan Ott, Owen King, Tanner Gran, Colton Lampert, Austin Bauer, Ethan DuCharme and Thomas Jergenson. Back row (l to r): Jordan Burg, Carson Coffield, Henry Russert, Gavin Schroeder, Kyle Sorenson, Justin Burg, Seth Twite, Alex Goergen, Ben McCabe and Sam Barthel.

By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

With his running mates nursing a variety of minor injuries, senior Justin Burg picked a good time to have a career high game in points scored.

Burg led the Warriors to a 93-65 win over St. Charles on Saturday at the Mayo Civic Center Auditorium.

He scored 18 points in the win and did some nice work underneath getting the rebound and easy put-back baskets.

It was a close game for about the first five to seven minutes. Burg set the tone early by scoring the first two points of the game, but behind some NBA three point shots, the Saints took an early 9-2 lead.

The Warriors, however, stayed calm, played within themselves and as things started to unravel for the Saints, Colton Lampert and Owen King put their foot on the gas and didn’t look back as they played a key role in an 18-3 run.

The rally forced St. Charles to take some quick shots and often times they shot from far back, near the half court line.

Lampert led the Warriors with 24 points and his slash to the basket style was hard for the Saints to stop.

Tanner Gran sparked the Warrior rally when he poked a ball away, hustled to grab it as it squirted towards the out of bounds then from the floor, tossed it to a streaking Lampert who put it in for the lay up on the other end.

The Warriors win the sub section and will bring their 25-4 record into the section championship against a 19-9 Rochester Lourdes team who disposed of Cannon Falls, 49-42 earlier on Saturday.

Stats

St. Charles 32 33–65

Caledonia 47 46–93

Owen King 18

Colton Lampert 23

Kyle Sorenson 5

Justin Burg 18

Austin Bauer 5

Gavin Schroeder 11

Seth Twite 2

Tanner Gran 4

Ethan DuCharme 2

Tristin Ott 3

Sean McGonigle 1

On Monday, February 23, the Warriors defeated Chatfield, 74-62 which set up the game against St. Charles.

Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus  Justin Burg has had a nice post season run thus far. Above he is pictured against Chatfield.

Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus
Justin Burg has had a nice post season run thus far. Above he is pictured against Chatfield.

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All-Conference gymnasts http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/all-conference-gymnasts/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/all-conference-gymnasts/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:20:12 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37396 Sierra Hunter, Kaylee Cavanaugh and Abby Hoskins were named to the All-Conference and All-Section gymnastics teams following a successful season. Dani Sauer, Caledonia gymnastics assistant coach, was named the Gymnastics Assistant Coach of the Year as well. Congratulations all four on a great season!

Submitted Left to right;  Kaylee Cavanaugh, Abby Hoskins, Dani Sauer and Sierra Hunter.

Submitted
Left to right; Kaylee Cavanaugh, Abby Hoskins, Dani Sauer and Sierra Hunter.

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Win over St. Charles sets up showdown with Chatfield http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/win-over-st-charles-sets-up-showdown-with-chatfield/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/win-over-st-charles-sets-up-showdown-with-chatfield/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:18:15 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37378 Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus  Sophomore Mariah Schroeder has been a key player and scorer for the Warriors this season.

Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus
Sophomore Mariah Schroeder has been a key player and scorer for the Warriors this season.

By Daniel E. McGonigle

General Manager

The Caledonia Argus

A solid, overall team effort by the Caledonia Warrior girls basketball team sees them moving on.

The Warriors won their opening round game against the sixth seeded St. Charles Saints, 65-56.

The Warriors held a 29-25 lead at half time and fought off an early run by the Saints.

“The girls did a nice job of not forcing shots; we moved the ball and took open shots and that’s a big reason we shot 50 percent,” head coach Kevin Klug said. “Jordyn (Krause)was 5/11 from the 3 point line and Mariah (Schroeder) was 8/11 from the field.”

The team also shot the ball well from the charity stripe.

“We also were 13/17 from the free throw line,” Klug said. “I thought Trece Frank was huge for us in this game with her high intensity and hustle play; she was all over the place and really helped give us the advantage to get the win.”

The win sets up a showdown against the two seed, Chatfield Gophers in the Secrtion 1AA-East semifinals. The Lady Gophers come into the game having defeated La Crescent, 67-26.

On December 23, the Warriors lost at home to the Lady Gophers, 68-45.

Information from Monday night’s game will be published in next week’s edition of the Caledonia Argus.

The other side of the bracket saw number one ranked PEM face Lake City after PEM defeated Lewiston-Altura, 65-25. Lake City defeated Cotter, 59-49.

Stats

Mariah Schroeder 20 pts, 6 reb, 3 assists

Jordyn Krause 15 pts

Trece Frank 9 pts, 4 steals

Tracy Felten 9 pts, 4 reb, 4 assists

Abby Bauer 4 pts, 4 reb, 3 steals

Lydia DeMorett 4 pts

Hanna Cuda 4 pts

Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus  Tracy Felten gets a fast break and looks to go to the hoop strong.

Ryan Pitts/The Caledonia Argus
Tracy Felten gets a fast break and looks to go to the hoop strong.

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Out of Africa http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/out-of-africa/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/out-of-africa/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 14:43:45 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37376 By Angela Denstad Stigeler

March looks to be roaring in like the king of the jungle, so perhaps we can appease the beast with a regional treat. A traditional “pudding” more in line with what we may consider a cake, Malva pudding is a homespun delight of Cape Dutch origin from South Africa. There are innumerable versions of this simple and delicious dessert, the hallmark of which is a sponge cake made with apricot jam. Once baked, it can soak up an impressive amount of sweet and buttery sauce. What’s best is that it can be quickly pulled together and there’s no need to let it cool before drenching it and serving it warm from the oven.

Just to make it even more tempting, and to give a nod both to the Dutch colonial heritage that influenced the region, and the importance of cacao to modern African agriculture, this version is complete with a bit of melted chocolate in the sauce. It’s just the sort of thing to warm you as winter rages one last time. This dessert, straight out of Africa, is sure to tame a sweet tooth—no lyin’.

Chocolate Malva Pudding

¾ cup sugar

2 large eggs

1 tablespoon softened butter

¼ cup apricot jam

grated zest of one orange

1 cup flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vinegar

¾ cup milk

Sauce

1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk

6 tablespoons butter

2 ounces chocolate

½ teaspoon almond extract (optional)

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and grease an 8-inch pan. In a large bowl, beat the sugar, eggs, butter, jam and orange zest until light and fluffy. Add the vinegar and milk and stir to combine.

In another bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda and salt. Gradually add the flour mixture to the egg mixture until combined. The batter will be thin. Pour it into the prepared pan and bake until a tester comes out clean, 25-30 minutes.

While the cake is baking, combine the sauce ingredients in a small saucepan and heat until the butter and chocolate are completely melted and the sauce is smooth.

Using a wooden skewer, poke several rows of holes in the cake, all the way through to the bottom. Slowly pour the warm sauce over the cake. Let it soak in for a few minutes, then serve warm.

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Deserving of our thanks http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/deserving-of-our-thanks/ http://hometownargus.com/2015/03/03/deserving-of-our-thanks/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 14:40:49 +0000 http://hometownargus.com/?p=37374 To the Editor:

Our county commissioners are a dedicated group of people who put serving the public above all else.  They spend countless hours working with and representing the people of Houston County. Our commissioners attend regular board meetings, as well as meetings of board sub-committees and county-related boards and commissions. They represent county concerns before local, state and national boards and commissions, including school boards, city councils, township boards, and state and federal offices.

Although the issue of frac sand mining is probably the most popular topic of concern throughout the county, let us not forget that our commissioners address numerous other issues and concerns.  A few of these topics include the county’s affairs, road systems, property and finances. Our commissioners review, adjust and adopt the annual county budget, authorize the levy and collection of county-wide property taxes, and serve as a board of equalization on disputes regarding appraised property values for taxing purposes. In addition, our commissioners establish policies and procedures for central administration and county departments. They oversee the county personnel system and the process for purchase of equipment and supplies for use by the county. This list of their duties and responsibilities could go on for miles.

While many of us return to our homes after a long day’s work, our job for the day is done. However, this is not the case for our commissioners. They receive phone calls, emails, and mail on a continual basis. Our commissioners sacrifice a lot of their family time and personal lives to serve the citizens of Houston County.  They knew the responsibilities expected of them when they decided to run for election and they chose to serve as leaders for the citizens of Houston County.

Let us not forget that as citizens of Houston County, we elected our county commissioners because we believed that they would be strong leaders.  If someone does not agree with the decisions that the county commissioners are making, or feels that he/she could do a better job, I would encourage them to consider running in the next commissioner race.  However, as of now, these dedicated individuals are our county commissioners. They are human like the rest of us, and yes, they make mistakes too. I encourage you to put yourself in their shoes. I know that I would not like to be constantly criticized about my work, and I do not think most other people would either. Therefore, rather than criticizing our county commissioners, I encourage the citizens of Houston County to work with them by effectively communicating and negotiating, rather than personally attacking them.

Thank you Judy, Justin, Steve, Teresa and Dana for your dedication and hard work.

Kelly Groth

Caledonia, Minnesota

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